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COPYRIGHT NOTICE

No photograph that is displayed and posted on this blog may be reproduced, copied, stored, manipulated or used in whole or in part of a derivative work without the prior written permission of the Copyright (c) Owner & Photographer: Trevor David Betts BA (Hons). All rights reserved.

A POLITE REMINDER

If you want to use any of my photographs displayed upon this blog, for inclusion in an essay, presentation, talk, or for posting on your blog or web site. Or for use in any other way or means. Then it would be very much appreciated if you could contact me first (as a matter of courtesy and decency) to seek my permission to use any of my photographs. Failure to do so is breach of my copyright and rights.




Saturday, 31 December 2011

WORLD WAR TWO STILL-LIFE STUDY

This studio still-life study features the following: The rear wheel of a Spitfire, a Soldier's pay book and completing the scene is some white lilies. It is a monochrome sepia toned print.

Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From the final assignment for the Higher National Diploma (Design) Photography course I did at at Bradford & Ilkley Community College, 1998-2001. Also from my Remembrance Series Project, 2000-2002.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Friday, 30 December 2011

ARP 1939 ISSUE

This simply lit studio still-life features a genuine 1939 issue gas rattle. Very similar to the rattles that football fans used to use at matches in the 1940s to 1960s. Yellow tulips feature in this shot, which was only lit by candle light (no studio flash).

The sand represents the sand's of the D-Day Beaches. A monochrome photographic print which was sepia toned. You will find straight-forward monochrome (not toned) images of photographic prints from this series featured elsewhere on this blog.

Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From my Remembrance Series Project, 2000-2002. The final assignment for the Higher National Diploma (Design) Photography course I was doing at Bradford & Ilkley Community College in 1998-2001.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

REMEMBRANCE TRIPTYCH



A triptych (set or series of three) monochrome photographic sepia toned prints. From a series exploring the act of remembrance in relation to certain species of flowers.

The first (top image) features a genuine British Infantry Helmet from WWII, a replica cricket/clicker (if you have ever seen the film: "The Longest Day," then you will know what this item was used for. A single red rose lays upon the sand.

The middle or second image features a photograph of six British soldiers having just arrived back at Paragon Railway Station in Hull after being rescued from the beaches of Dunkirk in 1940.  The documents featured are copies of a diagram of German Beach Defences etc for the period June 1944. White carnation flowers complete the scene.

The bottom and final photograph in this selection of images features a set of medals that belonged to a British Royal Army Medical Corps Soldier (his unit was one of the first to enter and liberate Belsen Concentration Camp in WWII). A yellow tulip completes this still-life scene.

Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From the final assignment for a Higher National Diploma (Design) Photography course I did at Bradford & Ikley Community College, 1998-2001. The Remembrance Series, 2000-2002.

Please Note: All the ammunition featured in these images is dummy (not live) rounds.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Thursday, 29 December 2011

FROM MONTY...

A letter of commendation to a British Soldier who fought for his country during the Second World War. This was kindly loaned to me by the widow of this soldier for my Remembrance Series Project, which was the final assignment for the Higher National Diploma  (Design) Photography course I did at Bradford & Ilkley Community College, 1998-2001.

This project looked at the symbolism of certain species of flowers, in relation to the act of remembrance.
It is a monochrome photographic print at the 16 inch by 12 inch size, which was then sepia toned.

Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From my Remembrance Series Project, 2000-2002.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Wednesday, 28 December 2011

THE FLYING SCOTSMAN ?

A different perspective. No, actually the wording on the carriage/coach side reads: "The Route of the Flying Scotsman." As everyone knows the Flying Scotsman was a legendary steam train. Along with the likes of the "Mallard" and many similar iron clad giants that used to roar up and down the train lines of the United Kingdom. Before "Doctor Beeching's" axe fell on the railways back in the 1960s.

Paragon Station, Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From my Chasing Shadows Project, final assignment for a National Diploma Photography & Related Studies course that I did at Hull College, 1995-98.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Tuesday, 27 December 2011

THE TRAIN LEAVING PLATFORM 2...

A train getting ready to leave the Station. In this murky shot fumes can be seen rising from the train, which is just about to depart the platform.

Paragon Station, Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From my Chasing Shadows Project, 1998. For an assignment for the National Diploma Photography & Related Studies course I was doing at Hull College.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Saturday, 24 December 2011

AND ANOTHER BLUE ONE...

This time its the glass doors entrance, with the distinctive logo. Another blue toned monochrome photographic print.

From a National Diploma Photography and Related Studies course assignment I did at Hull College, 1995-1998.

The Royal Armouries, Leeds, West Yorkshire, England.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Friday, 23 December 2011

BLUE TONED




A series of monochrome photographic prints that have had the blue tone treatment. This is a simple two bath chemical solution where the fully developed print is first immersed in a chemical solution (the blue toner). Then put into a simple salt/water solution. Before been properly washed and then dried. This series of blue toned prints just show you how relatively simple it is to change the whole tonal range and depth of a monochrome photographic print. You will find straight-forward monochrome prints of some of the images featured here, displayed elsewhere upon this blog spot.

The images featured here where taken on Ilford HP5 Film (rated at 400asa) using only available light, eg natural light coming in through the windows and artificial light (from the indoor lights). The camera was mounted upon a tripod to enable slower shutter and exposure speeds.

The Royal Armouries, Leeds, West Yorkshire, England.

From an assignment that I did for a National Diploma Photography and Related Studies course, 1995-1998. At Hull College, East Yorkshire, England.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Wednesday, 30 November 2011

GERBERAS

Cut flowers in other words. I am not very good at recognising different species of plants and trees, but I do know that these are Gerberas. A straight forward photographic print just using available natural light.

Kingston-upon-Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From no specific project as such.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Wednesday, 23 November 2011

SEA DEFENCES AT HAPPISBURGH

Wooden groynes snake out into the sea from the beach. A this location on the Norfolk coast which is subjected to regular erosion.

Happisburgh, Norfolk, England.

From my Traces from along the Edge Project, 2003-.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Sunday, 20 November 2011

FENCED IN

A wooden picket style fence to hold marriam grasses and sand dunes in place is featured here in this monochrome photographic print.

Holy Island, Northumberland, England.

From my Traces from along the Edge, 2003-.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Saturday, 19 November 2011

MORE PEBBLES

From the same location. A slightly different perspective of pebbles (or stones) stuck in a wooden groyne.

Sandsend, North Yorkshire, England.

From my Traces from along the Edge Project, 2003-.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

PEBBLES IN A GROYNE

With the shifting sands and tides, these stones or large pebbles have become logded in the gap between these two pieces of wooden groyne. A groyne is a man-made wooden structure that the Victorians invented has part of sea defences on British beaches and shores.

Sandsend, North Yorkshire, England.

From my Traces from along the Edge Project, 2003-.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Thursday, 17 November 2011

BRIDGE AT NIGHT

Drypool Bridge at night. The street lighting is reflected in the dark waters of the River Hull. This is just one of several bridges that cross this river and link East Hull with West Hull.

Drypool Bridge, Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From no specific project as such.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.


Friday, 11 November 2011

DON'T FORGET

From a personal perspective on the 11 November 2011 (11-11-11). Lest we forget, the following, who fell on operational service:

2nd BATTALION, THE ROYAL ANGLIAN REGIMENT
Private T. Anderson, 2nd Battalion of the Royal Anglian Regiment. 24 May 1982. Londonderry City Centre, Northern Ireland.
Major A. French, 2 Battalion of the Royal Anglian Regiment, British Army. 22 May 1986. Near Crossmaglen, South Armagh, Northern Ireland.
Private C. Davies, 2nd Battalion of the Royal Anglian Regiment. 9 July 1986. Near Crossmaglen, Northern Ireland.
Private M. Bertram, 2nd Battalion of the Royal Anglian Regiment. 9 July 1986. Near Crossmaglen, Northern Ireland.

BRITISH D-DAY AND NORMANDY VETERANS
Bob Thompson - Royal Military Police.
Ben Bainbridge - The RAF Regiment.
Alf Mellors - Royal Navy.
John Smith - Royal Navy.
Maxwell Vernon Hirst - East Yorkshire Regiment.
Len Pounder - Pioneer Corps.
Tom Lyons - Royal Army Medical Corps.
Phil Fisher - Coldstream Guards.
Len Wooldridge - Lincolnshire Regiment.

The four lads who fell in Northern Ireland, I personally knew two of them and Major French was the Officer Commanding the Rifle Company that I was attached to.

During the period 1998 - 2002 I undertook a major photographic documentary project with the surviving members of the Hull & District Branch of the Normandy Veterans Association. I got to know all those listed above who survived the horrors of WWII to fade away in old age.

It just seemed very appropriate to upload the above photograph and mention all those who have served their country (some who fell, others who survived but eventually faded away).

The above image is from my The Normandy Veterans - Lest We Forget Project, 1998-2002.

Former 24296655 Cpl TD Betts. 2 Royal Anglian 1979-88.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Monday, 7 November 2011

LEST WE FORGET

A wreath for 'The Fallen'. From the French Resistance, on the 55th Anniversary of the D-Day Landings of 6 June 1944.

Arromanches, Normandy, France (June 1999).

From my The Normandy Veterans - Lest We Forget Project, 1998-2002.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.


Friday, 28 October 2011

COASTAL EROSION

This old and battered reinforced metal piling looks like it is suffering from erosion. I had taken a series of  photographs of this structure with sepia toning in mind.

Filey, North Yorkshire, England.

From my Traces from along the Edge Project, 2002-.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Saturday, 15 October 2011

THE LOCK

The Lock Gates at the southern end of the Marina. One cold and winter evening.

The Marina, Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From a personal project about this area, 2007-.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Friday, 14 October 2011

NOTICEBOARD

'THE DOOR OPENS INTO HER FLAT AND INSTANTLY I'M OVERWHELMED BY THE FRAMED PHOTOS COVERING HER WALLS'


Squinting through the peephole, I'm startled by the sight of an eyeball pressed up to the other side. The giant retina then retreats and the form of a large man in a fleece jacket appears. 'Yes?' I call. 'You Ogden Chesnut?' the man says. 'Something like that.' I open the door. 'What can I do for you?'

He hands me a small box. 'From the old bird down below you.' I pierce the Sellotape and open it up. Inside is a Yashica 35mm film compact camera. I look up at him confused. 'That's very thoughtful of you. Are you her son?' I ask. 'Nah, mate. I'm just sorting her possessions. There ain't much. But she apparently wanted you to have that.'

'You mean she's...' 'Yeah, two nights ago.' Amid all the sirens and headlines and personal crises that occupy our days, my neighbour Rose quietly made her exit from the world with little fanfare. So good a neighbour was I, that I learned of her passing only days later .

'Does she have anyone to come by and collect her things?' I ask. 'Dunno, mate. We were just called to come and clear out the gaff so the new tenant can move in. Come down and have a look if there's anything else you want. I'll give you a good price.'

Charming Rose was quite outspoken, which is why it was so strange that I never saw her leave or people come to visit her. Her life was very insular within our building. I would see her every morning downstairs collecting post that was rarely anything more personal than a letter from the council. I often wondered if she had anyone in her life who cared about her, if she was lonely or perhaps running away, yet she always seemed happy.We traded pleasantries and regrets about the weather for most of our time together in the building, never delving beyond that. Only recently did she invite me in to her flat, but I had to decline as I was heading to Brighton that day. As I follow the fleeced man down the stairs I'm filled with a touch of regret.

The door opens into her flat and instantly I'm overwhelmed by the framed photos covering her walls. Every inch of space is used. There is no pattern or co-ordination in the frames. Instead, there is a timeline of Rose's life, charting husbands, boyfriends, colleagues, friends, more boyfriends, and then, as the photographs evolve into muted tones that finally burst into vibrant colour, Rose's hair washes into black & white and the group portraits grow fewer and fewer.

As I move towards the kitchen and the date stamps push towards the 21st century, people feature far less in Rose's photos, replaced by park landscapes, birds and street scenes. It strikes me  seeing this amazing visual record of Rose's life that as we get older and the people close to us pass on or move away, and as we slow down and wander less, the only evidence we have that we lived a full and vibrant life are the pictures on our wall.

We've often heard of other cultures who do not allow themselves to be photographed for fear that the camera traps their soul. More interesting to me, however, is the reluctance of the Amish people to be photographed, believing the camera only indulges in vanity. Perhaps there is an inherent element of vanity in photography. For some, like Rose, it may be to show that we were here and we loved, and were loved back.  For others it is to share our own personal view of the world. And for others yet it's to trap and keep a moment for ever because it pleases us.

There's nothing wrong with a little vanity, as long as we acknowledge it and know why it's there. I trap moments in time with my camera, probably because I largely failed to inspire the types of moments that adorn Rose's walls. 'I really must print more of my pictures,' I say, to no one in particular. 'Nah, mate,'  says the fleeced man. Just lash 'em up on Facebook. Easier to get rid of when you go.' He then drops the framed photos into a bin bag.

From an article by Ogden Chesnut. In the 15 October 2011 issue of Amateur Photographer magazine. An edited version appears here.

LIGHT TO DARK

I like the simple nature of this sepia toned monochrome print and the contrast between the sun shining on the water to the dark mould of a tyre track.

Cleethorpes, North-East Lincolnshire, England.

From my The Next Wave Project, 1995-96.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Thursday, 13 October 2011

NOTICEBOARD

Outposts: Donovan Wylie The Bradford Fellowship 2010/11
30 September 2011 - 19 February 2012
Gallery 1, National Media Museum, Bradford, West Yorkshire, England.

A photographic exhibition by Magnum Photographer Donovan Wylie. Which looks at military architecture. He was embedded with a Canadian Army unit, which gave him the opportunity to photograph  military outposts in the Kandahar Province of Afghanistan. This project follows on from his documenting of the various Military Watch Towers that used to be located along the Ulster/Eire border.

www.nationalmediamuseum.org.uk/donovanwylie

Daniel Meadows: Early Photographic Works
30 September 2011 - 19 February 2012
Gallery 2, National Media Museum, Bradford, West Yorkshire, England.

Between 1971 and 1987 Daniel Meadows produced an astonishing documentary photographic record of urban society in Britain. Large and small monochrome prints of ordinary human beings. This is a wonderful documentary project, which gives you a glance into how we used to live, dress and furnish our houses. In my opinion an excellent exhibition.

www.nationalmediamuseum.org.uk/danielmeadows

For more information please log onto the afore-mentioned web sites.

National Media Musem, Bradford, BD1 1NQ. Tel: 0844 856 3797

www.nationalmediamuseum.org.uk

Entry is free. But Donations are welcomed.

Monday, 10 October 2011

OLD GANG SMELT MILL (REVISITED)

The remains of this old industrial building, off the beaten track, high up in the Dales.

Old Gang Smelt Mill, The Yorkshire Dales, North Yorkshire, England.

From no specific project as such.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All right reserved.

Sunday, 9 October 2011

RIVA-BELLA

A black and white striped beach hut, on a fine June day on the Normandy coast. Part of the British Landing Zone (code named: Sword) on the morning of 6 June 1944. D-Day.

Riva-Bella, Normandy, France.

From my The Normandy Veterans - Lest We Forget Project, 1998-2002.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved,

Friday, 7 October 2011

AT THE JUNCTION

At the junction of Alfred Gelder Street and Lowgate, one late autumnal evening. With traffic light trails everywhere. If I did another copy of this print (I'd burn in the street lights a little more I think).

Alfred Gelder Street/Lowgate, Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From no specific project as such.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Thursday, 6 October 2011

IT'S THAT TIME OF YEAR

The weather has changed, it's becoming colder, it's raining and the night's are closing in. So it can only mean one thing - "It's Hull Fair". Starting tomorrow evening. With 113 stalls, from hook-a-duck to bingo. 250 attractions including 5 palm reader's and 55 rides for children. Daily from 4pm until 11pm (2pm on the Saturday). Closed on Sunday. Continues until Saturday 15 October 2011.

Hull Fair, Walton Street, Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From no specific project as such.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog site are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Tuesday, 4 October 2011

THE FAIR AGAIN

From 2007 I think. The Waltzer? From one of Europe's biggest touring fairs. Nearly that time of year again. Funny how the weather has changed as well.

Hull Fair, Walton Street, Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From no specific project as such.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Monday, 3 October 2011

DECK CHAIRS

The British Seaside would not be the same without these essential summer items. The stripey and very colourful deck chairs.

Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, England.

From my Traces from Along the Edge Project, 2003-.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Thursday, 22 September 2011

THE FAIR

It's nearly that time of year again. An image from the annual "Hull Fair". Which was formerly the famous "Nottingham Goose Fair". Held on Walton Street in Hull every October for more years than I can remember.

Hull Fair, Walton Street, Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From no specific project as such.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Tuesday, 20 September 2011

NAKED TREES

Bare trees (no leafs). Illuminated by street lightening, and surrounded by wooden benches, cobbled stone pavements and brick walls.

Near the Minerva Public House, The East side of the Marina, Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From my Tree Stories Project, 2002-

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Sunday, 18 September 2011

BRIDGE AND DOME

The well-known dome of St. Paul's stands out against the evening sky. At the far end of this more recent capital landmark.

The Millennium Bridge and St. Paul's Cathedral, London, England.

From no specific project as such.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Saturday, 17 September 2011

REEDS

Reeds in a Lake. Nothing more, nothing less.

Filey Dams Nature Reserve, Filey, North Yorkshire, England.

From no specific project as such.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Friday, 16 September 2011

BATTLE OF BRITAIN MONUMENT

A triptych of images of this splendid sculpture by the British Sculptor - Paul Day. It is a Memorial to all the Pilots who lost their life in "The Battle of Britain" in the summer of 1940, during WWII.

"Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few".

Victoria Embankment, Westminster, London, England.

From no specific project as such.

To see more of Paul Day's work log onto: www.pauldaysculpture.com

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Monday, 12 September 2011

THE RNLI HUMBER LIFEBOAT

The RNLI (Arun Class) Humber Lifeboat on the slipway. Get's a good power-jet washing down of it's hull and keel to rid it of any unwanted debris, such has barnacles etc.

Alexandra Docks, Grimsby, South Humberside, England.

From my In the Wake of the Bow Project, 1994-95.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Friday, 9 September 2011

GROYNES

A sepia toned print. The weather beaten remains of wooden groynes and attached remnants of fishing nets. Groynes are/were part of the sea defences for that particular stretch of beach/coast that helped slow down coastal erosion.

Spurn Point, East Yorkshire, England.

From my Coming at me in Waves Project, 1993-94.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Wednesday, 7 September 2011

TREE REFLECTIONS

Trees are reflected in this stream (or to be precise 'Clough'). A polarising filter was fitted to the camera lens for this shot.

The Hope Valley, Peak District, Derbyshire, England.

From my Tree Stories Project, 2002-.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Saturday, 3 September 2011

RUST

Another monochrome photographic print that has been sepia toned. A section of metal cladding over a bridge. Which has rusted over the course of time and due to the effect of adverse weather conditions.

Barmston Drain, Sculcoates, Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From my Barriers Project, 1997-98.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Monday, 29 August 2011

WAREHOUSE DOORS

A sepia toned print of some old warehouse doors. A old warehouse on the West Bank of the River Hull. There used to be many of these buildings, but heavy bombing during the Second World War, demolition and modernisation means there are only a handful left now. This building was demolished after an arson attack. There are now modern apartment buildings on this site.

West Bank of the River Hull, Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From a City & Guilds 9231 Photography Module: Photographing Buildings, 1989-90.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Thursday, 25 August 2011

URBAN DECAY

A old weather-worn and dilapidated store front, in this run-down area of town.

Humber Street, Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From a personal project about the area, 2007-.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Saturday, 20 August 2011

WILLOW BARK DETAIL

No this is not an image from my Tree Stories Project. I was just photographing things and places so that I could do some toning with the finished print. This is a Willow Tree blowing in the wind. The sepia toner brings out the detail and tonal depth in the bark.

The Boothferry Road area, Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From no specific project as such, circa 1990-92.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All right reserved.

Thursday, 18 August 2011

PAINTING THE LINE

A Ship Yard Worker paints the white coloured line that separates the two distinctive colours of the RNLI Humber Lifeboat's hull. During bi-annual Hull and Keel cleaning and repainting in dry dock. Barnacles and other debris that accumulates below the waterline upon the hull and keel can affect the boats speed by up to two knots.

Alexandra Dock, Grimsby, South Humberside, England.

From my In the Wake of the Bow Project, 1994-95.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blogspot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Monday, 15 August 2011

ANOTHER MISTY DAY

A lone wooden boat lies stranded upon the beach. A damp, wet and misty morning on the North East Coast. In fact if you want to see a totally different example of this particular image then take a look at my sepia and selenium toned print of the same image that is depicted above. It's the 29th of April 2009 posting on this blog.

Robin Hood's Bay, North Yorkshire, England.

From my The Next Wave Project, 1996-97

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Saturday, 13 August 2011

SHADOWS

A metal support of this structure casts shadows upon the water.

Cleethorpes Pier, North East Lincolnshire, England.

From my The Next Wave Project, 1996-97.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Thursday, 11 August 2011

BRIDGE IN CAR MIRROR

This is a reflection of the Humber Bridge in a car wing mirror. A straight forward monochrome print which was then given a very weak sepia toning.

Hessle Foreshore, North Humberside, England.

From no specific project as such, circa 1989-90.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Wednesday, 10 August 2011

MODERN TREES

Spotlights illuminate a plot of Silver Birch Trees, one fine evening. It's certainly a different perspective on this project (of mine).

Outside Tate Modern, London, England.

From my Tree Stories Project, 2002-.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Tuesday, 9 August 2011

MAJOR RUST

A slightly under developed print (under the enlarger and then in the dev tray). Which was then given the two-bath sepia toning treatment.

The old rusty metal gate of an oil company installation.

Wincolmlee, Kingston-upon-Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From my Barriers Project, 1997-98.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

SLIDE SHOW

HELLO AND WELCOME

To my Photo Blog,

All my monochrome photography is darkroom produced. This portfolio consists of photographs from several of my projects, assignments, personal and course related work. Some of these monochrome photographic prints are then selectively toned.

Take a look at the slide show, or the popular posts. Click onto some of the many excellent blogs that I have listed in my blog roll. I welcome constructive feedback (post a comment).

Click onto the links in some of my posts which will then take you to the relevant website link where you will be able to find out more about that location, charity or organisation etc featured in the post and which is relevant to that specific image.

Also please click onto my links. Join my blog and my Google + followers. If you would like to know more about any particular photograph or project then please send me an email. My email address is at the foot of this page.

Also from time to time I will post videos that are of interest to me, mainly from my military background.

Yours sincerely

Trevor David Betts BA (Hons)

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TECHNICAL INFORMATION

All the photographs featured on this blog spot were taken on Canon analog 35mm SLR cameras which included: Canon A1, Canon AE1 (non-programme) and Canon T90. The Canon A1 was rendered useless after prolonged exposure to salt spray residue, and the AE1 suffered a malfunction, and one of my T90s just packed up on me during a photographic shoot.

Most of my camera equipment was initially purchased brand new, then as the years have past I have purchased second-hand equipment. But the vast majority of equipment I currently possess is well over twenty years old.

Canon FD lenses used were: 28, and 35mm wide angle, 50mm standard, 35-105mm short telephoto zoom and a 70-210mm large telephoto zoom lenses. Also used was a loaned Mamiya 645 with 50 and 80mm lenses. My favourite combination is a T90 fitted with the 35-105mm lens with an Hoya orange filter. I use Hoya orange, red, neutral density, and skylight filters. Hoya and Canon lens hoods. A Canon remote cable. I have used a great Metz 45 CT-4 flashgun for many years. I used this for the bounced and fill-in flash for some of the documentary and portraiture work.

Studio flash used was Courtenay brolly flash (just two heads fitted with soft boxes) at Hull Community Artworks studio (sadly this excellent local arts facility closed in 2001). Billingham and Tamrac camera bags (the Billingham is a old model that I have had for years - wonderful bags). The Tamrac one is a medium sized back pack type bag. Slik Black Diamond 88, and 500 DX Pro tripods. A Cullmann touring set (which consists of a light tripod, ball and swivel head, all-purpose clamp, suction cap, and a ground spike). I presently have three Canon T90 and one A1 SLR cameras.

Film used was mainly 35mm (with some 120mm). Ilford Delta monochrome negative print film, 100 asa (a few rolls of 400 asa as well). Ilford HP5 and FP4 (400 and 125 asa respectively). Fuji Neopan 400 asa. Various Fuji colour film. Photographic chemicals: Ilford ID-11 and Microphen film developers. Agfa Rodinal fine grain film developer, and Ilford Hypam fixer.

Photographic paper: Ilford Multigrade IV VC paper, Fibre based VC paper including warm and cool tone. Kentmere Velvet Stipple and Art Document papers. Kodak selenium toner. Barclay and Fotospeed sepia toners, and Colorvir blue toner. Durst M60 and Meopta 5 enlargers fitted with 50 and 80mm Schneider lenses. Kenro negative sheets and Jessops negative folders.

Most of my photography involves the use of the camera being securely mounted onto the tripod, with the shutter set to the 10 second delay. I bracket my exposures (relying on the excellent Canon in-camera meter). My aperture settings are usually between F5.6 and F22. In the vast majority of cases the very first exposure I take is usually the correctly exposed one.

Finished photographic prints (spotted if needed). At the 10 x 8 inch size are then scanned on an Epsom 1660 photo perfection scanner using Adope Photoshop CS2 at the 5.5 x 3.5 inch image or canvas size, 150 dpi and at the 750 x 550 pixels size, and saved as for the web. The only thing that is manipulated is the brightness balance and contrast levels.

DON'T FORGET

"It is the soldier, not the minister, who has given us freedom of religion.

It is the soldier, not the lawyer, who has given us the right to fair protest.

It is the soldier, not the politician, who has given us freedom of speech.

It is the soldier, whose coffin is draped by the flag, who allows the protester to burn the flag."

From: "Fighting for Queen and Country,
by Nigel 'Spud' Ely. Blake Publishing London, 2007.
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