TRANSLATE

COPYRIGHT NOTICE

No photograph that is displayed and posted on this blog may be reproduced, copied, stored, manipulated or used in whole or in part of a derivative work without the prior written permission of the Copyright (c) Owner & Photographer: Trevor David Betts BA (Hons). All rights reserved.

A POLITE REMINDER

If you want to use any of my photographs displayed upon this blog, for inclusion in an essay, presentation, talk, or for posting on your blog or web site. Or for use in any other way or means. Then it would be very much appreciated if you could contact me first (as a matter of courtesy and decency) to seek my permission to use any of my photographs. Failure to do so is breach of my copyright and rights.




Saturday, 19 December 2009

UPDATE

As you may be aware I have experienced certain problems with my blog recently. That is why I have decided not to upload any new images until I have looked into this problem and sorted things out. However if you are a new visitor to this blog there are plenty of old postings for you to browse and look at.

As well as the problem with my image postings, I now have a problem with the slide show (when it rains it pours). I hope to have things back to normal and uploading new images early in the New Year.

However please take note of the problems I am currently experiencing, and take appropriate precautions yourself.

Thank you.

Trevor David Betts BA (Hons.)

19th December 2009.

Saturday, 12 December 2009

NOTICE

With immediate effect I will no longer be uploading any new images to this blog (investigation pending) This is due to external and unknown forces (well, unknown to me) messing with my images. I am in the process of investigating this at the moment. You just do not know who is downloading your work and perhaps passing it off as their own.

Therefore all I can say is just be aware of the following happening to your own blog. The culprit that seems to be doing this is http://2.bp.blogspot.com There are other number variations on this address such as the added prefix of 1,3 and 4 etc. You will note as well that there is no www. prefix to this blogs address. Perhaps they might have the decency to contact me and explain their actions.

I am sure that I have not given anyone permission to copy my work and pass it off as their own. What I find so annoying is the fact that this is a blogspot.com address. Personally I cannot stand computer hackers of any shape or form. This is, in my opinion a breach of my copyright and basically an infringement of my privacy.

As such I would suggest that when you scan any of your own work/images then you do so at a low resolution and size. At the same time I would advise you to put a watermark/copyright sign on it (that is if you wish to do that, to help protect your work even more). Also read the small script beforehand, and any information and tips which will help you in the long run.

Perhaps I have been a little naive in thinking that my photographs would be safe from public manipulation and interference. But you have corporate hackers and as well as individuals.

I would appreciate any relevant advice from blogger's who might have experienced the same problem. So everyone please be aware of what is happening to me. Future ongoing investigations will determine if I continue with this blog. I hope to do so, but for the time being I am putting a hold on uploading any new images.

Trevor David Betts BA (Hons.)

12th December 2009.

Wednesday, 9 December 2009

LIGHTS AND TREE

The illuminated entrance to the Central Library, with a silver birch tree in the background complete with Christmas lights. On a cold and damp December evening.

Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From my Tree Stories Project, 2003-.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Sunday, 6 December 2009

SUBMERGED BUNKER

The remains of a former WWII German gun bunker is seen here on the beach.

Near Asnelles, Normandy, France.

From my The Normandy Veterans - Lest We Forget Project, 1998-2002.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Saturday, 5 December 2009

FALLING WATER


An example of the same image but with two separate treatments. The first print is a straight forward wet-process hand printed image. The second is the same image but this one has been sepia toned. Basically immersed in a two bath sepia toner which changes the appearance of the print and increases the tonal range, at the same time giving the photographic print a archival permanence.

Ingleton, North Yorkshire, England.

From no specific project as such, 1992.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Tuesday, 1 December 2009

SHOT AT DAWN II

Another poignant image from the 'Shot at Dawn' Plot. The white stone statue depicts a young British soldier facing a firing squad. The dozens of wooden posts represent the three hundred such victims from the mud, blood and trenches of the First World War.

The National Memorial Arboretum, Arelwas, Staffordshire, England.

From my Tree Stories Project, 2003-.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Sunday, 22 November 2009

SCRAP YARD CARS

An image taken at a local scrap yard for a city and guilds assignment. The finished print has being sepia toned.

Hedon Road, Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From no specific project as such, circa 1993.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Saturday, 21 November 2009

MEMORIAL AT LION-SUR-MER

A steel Obelisk besides a Churchill tank is a memorial located in this village which is close to "Sword" Beach. One of the designated landing areas for British forces on the morning of 6th June 1944.

Lion-sur-mer, Normandy, France.

From my The Normandy Veterans - Lest We Forget Project, 1998-2002.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

PHOTOGRAMS





A series of Photograms. As such a very simple yet effective process of producing a photographic image in the darkroom. With just the red/amber safety lights on you place a piece of unexposed photographic paper under the enlarger and then simply place your selected objects on top of this. All you do then is turn the enlarger on and expose the photographic paper as per a normal photographic print. This process works best with the more translucent materials.

Hull Community Artworks Darkroom circa 1993.

From no specific project as such.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Saturday, 14 November 2009

UPON REFLECTION

I think this photograph looks very painterly. A little 'Monet' in perspective perhaps? Silver birch trees reflected in a lake.

Near Ollerton, Nottinghamshire, England.

From my Tree Stories Project, 2003-.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

ALL READY

A young Cocker Spaniel dog is all ready and prepared for an operation in the Operating Room. The resulting operation was successful by the way.

The People's Dispensary for Sick Animals, Animal Treatment Centre, Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From my For the Animals Project, 1989.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

WHITBY PIER

A brooding dark summer sky over this lovely part of the North Yorkshire Coast.

Whitby, North Yorkshire, England.

From my Traces from along the Edge Project, 2005-.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Wednesday, 11 November 2009

LEST WE FORGET





On Armistice Day I have decided to upload and publish these four images in an attempt to remind us all to "Never Forget" those that have fallen. It is also perhaps very appropriate considering the young British lives lost in current wars. I have not published these particular images before.


BOB THOMPSON: Bob is the gent second from the left, he is accompanied by Belgium gentlemen in WWII replica military uniforms. Bob served in the Royal Military Police during WWII and he participated in the Normandy Campaign. Sadly he is no longer with us. It was my honour to have known him (and many more like him). Bayeux, Normandy, France.

POINTE DU HOC: This is the memorial to the 2nd US Rangers who took this position on the morning of D-Day. Their mission was to silence the large field guns located here which could have caused massive casualties on American forces landing at the nearby Omaha Beach. If you have seen the film "The Longest Day", the Rangers actions were featured in this film. Pointe du hoc, Normandy, France.

TAKE THE WEIGHT OFF THOSE FEET: A memorial bench to Frederick Scott Walker of the 9th Battalion of the Parachute Regiment, British Army. Whose unit took the nearby Merville Gun Battery in the hours of darkness just before the seaborne landings on the 6th June 1944. Merville, Normandy, France.

HISTORY LESSON: A group of French school children on a field trip. Here you can see a section of the remaining elements of "The Mulberry Harbour",the floating concrete harbour and pontoons that played a major part in resupplying the Allied Armies has they advanced into Nazi-occupied Europe. Arromanches, Normandy, France (also known has Port Winston).

All images are from my The Normandy Veterans - Lest We Forget Project, 1998-2002.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Monday, 9 November 2009

RAIN OF TEARS

All the angels were crying and their tears came pouring down, so it would seem, judging by the amount of rain that was falling upon all and sundry on this very damp autumnal Sunday morning.

Gazing out from underneath the relative warmth and dryness of my umbrella towards the tall and imposing stone structure of the Cenotaph, and then glancing around me, all I could see was a sea of humanity and wave-after-wave of umbrellas, many just a drab monochrome colour, whilst others were more vividly coloured.

The rain continued to pour down and it added to the solemn nature of the occasion. Then the haunting and distinctive notes of the "Last Post" lingered upon the still air and faded away into the clouds.

All was silent apart from the pitta-patter of the rain has it hit the plethora of umbrellas, and in the distance the sound of a dog barking his own protestations against this downpour. Then for a brief moment the sun crept out from behind a dark cloud and shone onto the west facing side of the Cenotaph.

After the service, and after the march past of a dwindling band of WWII veterans, Regular and Territorial Army soldiers and cadets. Dozens of people made their way onto the steps of the war memorial.

Perhaps the most poignant reminder of why the hundreds of people had turned out in this appalling weather to pay their respects to "The Fallen", was a blood-red wreath of poppies which stood on the top step alongside many other such wreaths. In the centre of the wreath was a small colour photograph of Private Jonathan Young, an 18 year old infantry soldier from the Yorkshire Regiment. A local lad who had recently lost his life in Afghanistan.

Just in front of this memorial is a small grass lawn surrounded on all sides by several small stone and marble monuments to remember past conflicts and wars. I noticed a very young boy who was carefully placing three small simple wooden crosses (with just a single red poppy in the centre of each cross) on the edge of this lawn alongside many other similar crosses. His sister held a "Thomas the Tank Engine" umbrella over him whilst he performed this sombre but important task.

The torrential downpour was perhaps in keeping with the day, as no doubt many tears were shed during the service and many more tears will perhaps be shed in the future has wives lose husbands, mothers lose sons and children lose fathers in some corner of a foreign field.

By Trevor David Betts BA (Hons.)

9 November 2009.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Friday, 6 November 2009

WWII PARA VETERAN

A former British Second World War D-Day Veteran, who served in the British 6th Airborne Division poses for my camera. It is quiet appropriate don't you think, especially bearing in mind that we are now approaching Remembrance Sunday, that this image of a brave old warrior should appear on my blog now.

Paddington, London, England.

From my The Normandy Veterans - Lest We Forget Project, 1998-2002.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Thursday, 5 November 2009

THE 13.30 TO SHEFFIELD

The 13.30 hour train to Sheffield just a minute before it left the station.

Paragon Railway Station, Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From my Chasing Shadows Project, 1998.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Tuesday, 3 November 2009

FINAL RESTING PLACE

These simple white crosses mark the final resting place of thousands of young American GIs who fell in the battle for "Omaha" beach on D-Day, and the subsequent battle for Normandy. It is a very moving place to visit. If you have seen the film "Saving Private Ryan", then you will have seen this cemetery has it is featured in both the opening and closing sequences of this film.

American WWII Military Cemetery near St.Laurent-sur-mer, Normandy, France.

From my The Normandy Veterans - Lest We Forget Project, 1998-2002.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Thursday, 29 October 2009

JUST LOOKING

Two ladies indulge in a spot of window shopping, by looking into the front of this shop.

The People's Dispensary for Sick Animals (PDSA), Charity Shop, Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From the For the Animals Project, 1989.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

STATION REFLECTIONS

A puddle on one of the platforms clearly shows a section of the Railway Station's roof.

Paragon Railway Station, Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From the Chasing Shadows Project, 1998.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Sunday, 25 October 2009

WAITING

Members of the public with their domestic pets wait in the Waiting and Reception area of the PDSA Animal Treatment Centre to see the duty Vet.

The PDSA Animal Treatment Centre, Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From the For the Animals Project, 1989.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

NOTICEBOARD

I DON'T LIKE EXPLOSIONS

Quite apt this title don't you think at this time of year when all the young pyro-maniacs and trainee arsonists are busy setting off fireworks left, right and centre.

"I don't like explosions. I don't mind progress. But digital photography has made every man, women and chimpanzee a photographer of sorts and consequently has numbed down the general quality of photographs" - Elliott Erwitt.

From a retrospective exhibition of his work at the National Media Centre, Bradford, West Yorkshire, England. 2008.

TOO MANY CARS

In this image is a mutiple in-camera shot of a parking lot, shot from a nearby high rise building, the finished print was sepia toned.

Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From no specific project as such, 1989.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Thursday, 22 October 2009

SEATED AT WHITBY

People enjoying a sit down on the quayside, with the church on the cliff top opposite in clear view, that inspired Bram Stoker when he was writing "Dracula".

Whitby, North Yorkshire, England.

From the Traces from along the Edge Project, 2005-.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the xclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Wednesday, 21 October 2009

PEBBLE

A large pebble is stuck in the gap between two pieces of a wooden 'groyne'. Which is part of the beach defences.

Sandsend, North Yorkshire, England.

From the Traces from along the Edge Project, 2005-.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All right reserved.

NOTICEBOARD

TWIN TOWERS RISE AGAIN

Police photographer Neil Kitson could not believe his eyes on a recent trip to New York. The horrific events of 9/11 changed the New York skyline forever but when the West Yorkshire Police photographer went to commemorate the eighth anniversary of the terror attacks, The Twin Towers made an eerie return.

Mr Kitson was photographing the annual Tribute in Light memorial at Ground Zero when this image was captured - and it was severe weather conditions that temporarily brought the towers back to life.

"Normally the lights are more cylinder-like" said Mr Kitson, a photographer with the force for 20 years. "But because it was raining heavily and there were gale force winds on the night, the wind must have whipped up the clouds and made them look rectangular. "It just looked so real, I couldn't believe it. "It was a dog walker who suddenly shouted, 'Look, the Twin Towers are back', so I just got my camera out and started snapping away".

After he returned from his six-day trip, Mr Kitson sent the pictures to Getty Images only to be told by its New York office that they looked too fake and "too Photoshopped". After having to send the original shots to Getty to prove they were legitimate and with assistance from the London office, the images were finally accepted and will now be permanently marketed by Getty.

Mr Kitson said: "It was so frustrating that they didn't believe me. I thought it was strange that none of the papers the following day had picked up on it so I thought I'd take advantage".

One of his images is now being used to create a postcard which will be sold in the New York Police Department Museum shop. All other proceeds made from his images with Getty will be given to the British Memorial Garden Trust at Hanover Square, New York.


From an article in the Yorkshire Post newspaper, 20 October 2009. By Joanne Ginley.

Tuesday, 20 October 2009

BEN AND SUITCASE

Normandy Veteran and former WWII RAF Regiment Soldier Ben Bainbridge poses for the camera, holding his sister's 1939 evacuee issue suitcase.

Paddington, London, England.

From The Normandy Veterans - (Lest we forget) project, 1998-2002.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

NOTICEBOARD

BEACH BAN

A photographer told by a council official he was not allowed to take pictures on a Dorset beach without a permit - because of a new 'bylaw' - is taking the matter up with politicians. Speaking to AP, Steve Cook fears the rule will hit wedding photographers who regularly use the beaches for their work.

It has also emerged that photographers must seek permission from Poole Council before taking 'commercial photographs on council-owned land'. The council says photographers also need to prove they have 'public liability insurance'.

Steve Cook had being taking photographs on the Sandbanks Beach for a charity project when a council warden stopped him. He displayed a photo rights card issued last year by the Bureau of Freelance Photographers, but to no avail.

Amid reports that a commercial photography permit is also now required for the borough's 'public highways', the incensed photographer promptly wrote to the council chiefs and local MP, Annette Brooke and Robert Syms. In the letter seen by AP, Cook blasts the move as 'petty officialdom'. He adds: 'Originally I was told that it was a Poole bylaw, now it just seems that there is a secret (that is, no one knows about it) directive that all professional photographers need a permit to take photographs in the Borough of Poole, including pavements and public highways.

'Not only is this blatantly an infringement of civil liberties, going against Home Office and Number 10 advice, but it is totally unworkable. 'I would need in excess of 20-30 permits a week to carry out my work (as would most other pro photographers). Cook has called for an end to the 'outrageous restrictions on the 'livelihood and civil liberties of all professional photographers'.

Poole Council admits that the warden was 'incorrect' in telling Cook that the move was the result of a new bylaw. In a statement, a council official spokesman added: 'While we are keen to promote our beaches and other locations in Poole for this purpose, we must also balance this with the interests of other beach users and our duty to ensure public safety.'

The council later told AP that the requirement for permission and proof of public liability insurance is also designed to protect the privacy of children. This incident is the latest in a long line of clashes between photographers and officialdom over the past couple of years, sparking AP's nationwide campaign to defend the rights of photographers in public places.


From an article in Amateur Photographer magazine on the 'Snapshot' page column of the 24 October 2009 issue.

Monday, 5 October 2009

HULL & HUMBER

The "Hull & Humber" boat is moored up here just days before the start of the "Clipper Round the World Race".

The Marina, Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From no specific project as such, 2009.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Sunday, 4 October 2009

SWING BRIDGE

An old Swing Bridge is in the foreground of this shot. With the boat's from the "Round the World Clipper Race", moored up in the background.

From no specific project as such, 2009.

The Marina, Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

OLD STONE

The base of an old stone monument, which is showing signs of decay is featured here.

Undercliffe Cemetery, Bradford, West Yorkshire, England.

From no specific project as such, 2009.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Friday, 2 October 2009

CAPE BRETON

The Canadian entrant in the "Clipper Round the World Race". Moored up in Hull Marina before the start of the race.

The Marina, Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From no specific project as such, 2009.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Wednesday, 30 September 2009

QINGDAO

Another image from the "Clipper Race". All ten yachts were in the Marina before the start of the race and they drew huge crowds (well not in this photo).

The Marina, Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From no specific project as such, 2009.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Tuesday, 29 September 2009

FLORA II

Another image from my recent 'Flora' range, again it is a gerboa flower head, lit by natural light and using a Close-up filter fitted to a 50mm lens.

Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From no specific project as such, 2009.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Sunday, 27 September 2009

IN THE RIGGING

From the "Clipper Round the World Race". When all the yachts were in Hull Marina for 6 days before the start of the race. Here a crew member of "Lighting Bolt" is high up in the boat's rigging. In the background is one of the few remaining original (now refurbished) old Warehouses - 'Warehouse 13', now a residential block.

Hull Marina, Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From no specific project as such, 2009.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

ANGEL'S FEET

This image is of a final resting place of someone in Undercliffe Cemetery. An old Victorian Cemetery (and Nature Reserve) which is the final resting place for many of the wealthy "Victorian Wool Barons" and their families.

Bradford, West Yorkshire, England.

From no specific project as such, 2009.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

NOTICEBOARD

POLICE STOP SPARKS GP CALL-OUT

A Photography enthusiast says he was made to feel like a criminal and had to call a doctor out after police stopped him filming in a Cheshire park.

The 58-year-old man has pledged to never to return to Town Hall Park in Runcorn after being treated like a 'suspected paedophile', according to the Runcorn and Widnes Weekly News.

It is understood that a member of the public had made a complaint to a Police Community Support Officer (PCSO) after the photographer was seen near a children's play area. The photographer, who declined to be named to avoid 'further humiliation', told the newspaper. 'I've been taking photographs there for 35 years. I was filming when the PCSO told me to stop'.

The PCSO reportedly asked him for ID, and ran his name through a computer, but declined to view the captured images. The photo enthusiast was told that if any more complaints were made he would be arrested and his camera gear seized. 'I feel vilified and persecuted even though I was just a private citizen going about my business,' said the photographer. "When I went home I was in shock and had to call the GP out".

A police spokesman told AP: 'A local police community support officer was on patrol in the park on Friday (11 September). "Whilst on patrol he saw a man filming near the children's play area and advised how his actions could be construed. At no point was the man told to stop filming".

From an article in Amateur Photographer magazine, 3 October 2009.

Footnote:

The whole ruddy World has gone mad. I think that I will have to start wearing a vest/bib with the words "I am a Photographer, Not a Terrorist nor a Paedophile, and it is Not a Crime to take Photographs in a Public Place". Or would that make me more of a target for the "Mentally Retarded Moron's" that I have already encountered locally on my photographic travels and daily business.

Saturday, 26 September 2009

RAILING SHADOWS

The late afternoon summer sun casts and creates shadows of these metal hand railings onto the concrete paving of the promenade.

Bridlington, East Yorkshire, England.

From the Traces from along the Edge Project, 2005-.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

FLORA

A orange Gerboa flower head is featured in this still-life study. I was experimenting using a set of close-up filters fitted to a 50 mm standard lens (both of which I should really use more often). Lit by natural light, coming in from a south facing window.

Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From no specific project as such, 2009.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Wednesday, 23 September 2009

HULL

The hull of a boat is featured in this image. In the harbour at this popular North East coastal town and fishing port.

Whitby, North Yorkshire, England.

From the Traces from along the Edge Project, 2005-.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Sunday, 20 September 2009

BACK FROM DUNKIRK

A still-life study, shot in the studio. Which features a loaned photograph of six soldiers from a signals unit of the British Army, who have just returned home to Hull after being evacuated from the beaches of Dunkirk in 1940. The photograph was loaned to me by the son of the soldier (second from the left).

Hull Community Artworks, Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From the Remembrance Series Project, 2000-2001.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Wednesday, 16 September 2009

FOREGROUND TO DISTANCE

Reeds in the foreground give way to wind swept ripples upon the water, then the reflection of the footbridge in the water before the footbridge itself.

Willoughby Woods, Market Rasen, Lincolnshire, England.

From no specific project as such, 1989.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Wednesday, 9 September 2009

THE NEW FOREST

In the depths of the New Forest, a small river winds it's way through the landscape.

The New Forest, Hampshire, England.

From the Tree Stories Project, 2003-.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Sunday, 6 September 2009

TREE REFLECTION

The shadows of several trees are reflected in the gleaming paintwork of this car. Quiet symbolic this image I think, you have the car (one of the biggest pollution causer's) and the reflection of the trees which counter-act this pollution by absorbing noxious gasses.

Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From no specific project as such, 1997.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Saturday, 5 September 2009

SILO

A white coloured vegetable oil silo and steps leading up to the top are featured in this shot, with a fluffy white cloud just creeping from behind the silo in the foreground and into view.

Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From no specific project as such, 1992.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Wednesday, 2 September 2009

HALL OF STEEL

Looking up along and through to the doomed roof of this hall of steel. Where dozens of pikes, lances, swords, muskets, breast plates and helmets are displayed upon the walls.

The Royal Armouries, Leeds. West Yorkshire, England.

From no specific project as such, 1997.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Sunday, 30 August 2009

CHAIR

Now I should not imagine that this piece of garden furniture has washed up here. This discarded item sits in front of a collection of concrete "tank blocks" from the Second World War era, that now form part of the sea wall defences against the North Sea.

Spurn Point, East Yorkshire, England.

From the Traces from along the Edge Project, 2005-.

Copyright of all images and work displayed on this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Tuesday, 25 August 2009

NOTICE BOARD

GREAT PHOTOGRAPHER STORY

It was in the summer of either 1982 or '83 that a friend and I attended a pop concert in London. We then stayed an extra day to take in a few sights. I'd just bought an Olympus OM10.

I tried a few shots in Trafalgar Square. It was my first 35mm camera and I was trying to make sense of all those strange figures on the lens barrel and the shutter speed dial.

My friend was yelling at me to get a move on when a long-haired bloke with a camera bag approached me. 'Having problems?' he grinned. I was indeed having problems. As the camera lacked the add-on manual adapter, I'd been trying to sort out shutter speeds and apertures when in actual fact all I needed to do was just set it on auto, select an aperture and fire away. I didn't know this, of course until my knight in shining armour told me .

My friend sat there waiting for me to take her picture, and I was about to do so when my charming new pal said, 'Hang on a minute'. He took the newspaper out of my pocket, opened it and stood sideways on to my friend. He explained that by using the paper to reflect the light on to my friends face it would help control the contrast.

I pointed to his bulky camera bag and asked if he were a professional photographer. He nodded and I made a joke about how he must be loaded. He smiled and said, 'I do OK'.

After I'd thanked him for his help he reached into his bag, pulled out two rolls of film and handed them to me. 'Try it' , he said. 'You might like it'. What an absolute gent, I thought and with a smile he was on his way.

A couple of months later my late dad bought a copy of a now long-gone photo magazine. Inside was a portfolio by a world-famous photographer called Bob Carlos Clarke. As I sat gazing at a shot of a crashed helicopter my gaze then went to the small portrait of Clarke at the head of the page. It was him - the bloke who'd come to my aid. When I excitedly told my dad he was as stunned as I was.

We noted from the article that Bob was was a huge fan of Kodak Tri-X. I rushed to my room and dug out the two rolls of film he'd given me. Tri-X I'd noted. It was those rolls of film and a little help from my photography-mad dad that got me into processing and printing mono, which I have been doing ever since.

It was so sad when Bob took his own life, and he has been saddled with the 'troubled genius' label. He may have ended his life deeply troubled, but I will never forget the kindness he showed to an out-of-her depth Geordie lass trying to get to grips with her first camera.

From an article in the Back Chat section of Amateur Photographer magazine by AP reader Susan Cave, 22nd August 2009. An edited version is displayed here.

Footnote: I have heard a similar story from someone who I used to know, when he talked to Bob at the annual Focus on Imaging show held at the N.E.C, Birmingham in 1989. He obviously had time for people and was approachable.

I like no doubt many other serious photographers was very upset to hear of his passing in such tragic circumstances. I have one of his prints that takes pride of place on my living room wall.

Sunday, 23 August 2009

LIME WOODS

The shadows of various trees are cast onto a footpath.

Bardney Lime Woods, Near Wragby, Lincolnshire, England.

From the Tree Stories Project, 2003-.

Copyright of all images and work displayed on this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Saturday, 22 August 2009

AFTER THE RAIN

Just after some rain on a winter evening, the traffic lights are reflected in a puddle on the pavement, along with the wheel of a bicycle.

Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From a personal project about urban nocturnal photography, 2007-.

Copyright of all images and work displayed on this blog spot is the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

DONNA

A wild young common seal. An experimental image in the sense that the print was briefly exposed to white light i.e. solarisation (in the darkroom) then developed, stopped and fixed not quite as normal though. I then increased the contrast when scanning the print. But it looks okay to me. None of the seals were disturbed by me, during the photography.

Somewhere on the Lincolnshire Coast, England.

From no specific project as such, 2005.

Copyright of all images and work displayed on this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Sunday, 16 August 2009

IN RECOVERY

This young dog is recovering from a canine virus, in the Recovery Kennels of the Hull branch of the People's Dispensary for Sick Animals (PDSA).

The PDSA Animal Treatment Centre, Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From the For the Animals Project, 1989.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

SLIDE SHOW

HELLO AND WELCOME

To my Photo Blog,

All my monochrome photography is darkroom produced. This portfolio consists of photographs from several of my projects, assignments, personal and course related work. Some of these monochrome photographic prints are then selectively toned.

Take a look at the slide show, or the popular posts. Click onto some of the many excellent blogs that I have listed in my blog roll. I welcome constructive feedback (post a comment).

Click onto the links in some of my posts which will then take you to the relevant website link where you will be able to find out more about that location, charity or organisation etc featured in the post and which is relevant to that specific image.

Also please click onto my links. Join my blog and my Google + followers. If you would like to know more about any particular photograph or project then please send me an email. My email address is at the foot of this page.

Also from time to time I will post videos that are of interest to me, mainly from my military background.

Yours sincerely

Trevor David Betts BA (Hons)

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TECHNICAL INFORMATION

All the photographs featured on this blog spot were taken on Canon analog 35mm SLR cameras which included: Canon A1, Canon AE1 (non-programme) and Canon T90. The Canon A1 was rendered useless after prolonged exposure to salt spray residue, and the AE1 suffered a malfunction, and one of my T90s just packed up on me during a photographic shoot.

Most of my camera equipment was initially purchased brand new, then as the years have past I have purchased second-hand equipment. But the vast majority of equipment I currently possess is well over twenty years old.

Canon FD lenses used were: 28, and 35mm wide angle, 50mm standard, 35-105mm short telephoto zoom and a 70-210mm large telephoto zoom lenses. Also used was a loaned Mamiya 645 with 50 and 80mm lenses. My favourite combination is a T90 fitted with the 35-105mm lens with an Hoya orange filter. I use Hoya orange, red, neutral density, and skylight filters. Hoya and Canon lens hoods. A Canon remote cable. I have used a great Metz 45 CT-4 flashgun for many years. I used this for the bounced and fill-in flash for some of the documentary and portraiture work.

Studio flash used was Courtenay brolly flash (just two heads fitted with soft boxes) at Hull Community Artworks studio (sadly this excellent local arts facility closed in 2001). Billingham and Tamrac camera bags (the Billingham is a old model that I have had for years - wonderful bags). The Tamrac one is a medium sized back pack type bag. Slik Black Diamond 88, and 500 DX Pro tripods. A Cullmann touring set (which consists of a light tripod, ball and swivel head, all-purpose clamp, suction cap, and a ground spike). I presently have three Canon T90 and one A1 SLR cameras.

Film used was mainly 35mm (with some 120mm). Ilford Delta monochrome negative print film, 100 asa (a few rolls of 400 asa as well). Ilford HP5 and FP4 (400 and 125 asa respectively). Fuji Neopan 400 asa. Various Fuji colour film. Photographic chemicals: Ilford ID-11 and Microphen film developers. Agfa Rodinal fine grain film developer, and Ilford Hypam fixer.

Photographic paper: Ilford Multigrade IV VC paper, Fibre based VC paper including warm and cool tone. Kentmere Velvet Stipple and Art Document papers. Kodak selenium toner. Barclay and Fotospeed sepia toners, and Colorvir blue toner. Durst M60 and Meopta 5 enlargers fitted with 50 and 80mm Schneider lenses. Kenro negative sheets and Jessops negative folders.

Most of my photography involves the use of the camera being securely mounted onto the tripod, with the shutter set to the 10 second delay. I bracket my exposures (relying on the excellent Canon in-camera meter). My aperture settings are usually between F5.6 and F22. In the vast majority of cases the very first exposure I take is usually the correctly exposed one.

Finished photographic prints (spotted if needed). At the 10 x 8 inch size are then scanned on an Epsom 1660 photo perfection scanner using Adope Photoshop CS2 at the 5.5 x 3.5 inch image or canvas size, 150 dpi and at the 750 x 550 pixels size, and saved as for the web. The only thing that is manipulated is the brightness balance and contrast levels.

DON'T FORGET

"It is the soldier, not the minister, who has given us freedom of religion.

It is the soldier, not the lawyer, who has given us the right to fair protest.

It is the soldier, not the politician, who has given us freedom of speech.

It is the soldier, whose coffin is draped by the flag, who allows the protester to burn the flag."

From: "Fighting for Queen and Country,
by Nigel 'Spud' Ely. Blake Publishing London, 2007.
"