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COPYRIGHT NOTICE

No photograph that is displayed and posted on this blog may be reproduced, copied, stored, manipulated or used in whole or in part of a derivative work without the prior written permission of the Copyright (c) Owner & Photographer: Trevor David Betts BA (Hons). All rights reserved.

A POLITE REMINDER

If you want to use any of my photographs displayed upon this blog, for inclusion in an essay, presentation, talk, or for posting on your blog or web site. Or for use in any other way or means. Then it would be very much appreciated if you could contact me first (as a matter of courtesy and decency) to seek my permission to use any of my photographs. Failure to do so is breach of my copyright and rights.




Thursday, 8 August 2013

THE TEAM


The dedicated and professional team (including Vets, Veterinary Nurses and Receptionists) from the P.D.S.A Animal Treatment Centre, Hull.

To find out more about the P.D.S.A, and how you can help just log onto: For the Animals and this will take you to the People's Dispensary for Sick Animals web site.

The P.D.S.A. Animal Treatment Centre, Kingston upon Hull, North Humberside, England.

From a City & Guilds Social Documentary module in Photography, 1989.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Thursday, 27 June 2013

ON THE ATTACK


Boothferry Park in the 1983-84 Season. Hull City start another run into their opponents half.

From a series of images that I took for the Match Day Programme.

Boothferry Park, Kingston upon Hull, North Humberside, England.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.


Wednesday, 26 June 2013

COUNTING UP


As the title says. It's counting up the many donations that are given to the People's Dispensary for Sick Animals on a daily basis. The P.D.S.A. is a registered charity that provides veterinary care for "Pets in Need of Vets." It relies entirely on the support of the public.

To find out more about the P.D.S.A. and how you can help please just click onto: P.D.S.A.

The P.D.S.A. Office, Beverley Road, Kingston upon Hull, North Humberside, England.

From a project that I did for the Social Documentary module for the City & Guilds 9231 Certificate in Photography, 1989.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Thursday, 6 June 2013

DAY OF DAYS

So that we don't forget that freedom comes's at an heavy price (Today of all days). The monochrome photographic image above is the final resting place of a young British Army infantry soldier from the East Yorkshire Regiment
(whose 2nd and 5th Battalions landed on the beaches of Normandy on the morning of 6th June 1944). Today is the 69th anniversary of this epic military operation.

The British Second World War Military Cemetery, Douvres de la Deliverandes, Normandy, France.

From my The Normandy Veterans - Lest We Forget Project, 1998-2002.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Friday, 10 May 2013

HEADER


The Tiger's Number 10 wins the ball from an opposing team's defender to set Brian Marwood off down the wing. From the 1983-84 season.

Boothferry Park, Kingston upon Hull, North Humberside, England.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive right of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Tuesday, 7 May 2013

UTT


After last Saturday it seems very appropriate to post this picture. Sports photography is a very disciplined area, one that I have not a great deal of experience in, it must be said. However during the 1983-84 promotion season from the old 4th Division I used to attend various matches to photograph the likes of Billy Whitehurst and Les Mutrie of Hull City AFC. Billy Whitehurst was a battering ram of a centre forward (far right). With his strike partner Les Mutrie (third from left) who was more agile with a turn of pace.

I used to use a Canon 70-210mm telephoto lens fitted with a x 2 converter and a Hanimex 500mm Mirror lens. Apart from taking photographs at 'The Tiger's' spiritual home of Boothferry Park, I travelled to such places as Chester, Brentford, Penrith (FA Cup) and Rochdale to name but a few away grounds. UTT - Up the Tiger's.

Boothferry Park, Kingston upon Hull, North Humberside, England.

Photographs for use in the official Hull City Match Day Programme, circa 1983-84.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive copyright of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Tuesday, 30 April 2013

MONOCHROME TO SEPIA


Another example of sepia toning. The first monochrome photographic print is a straight forward print with no toning at all. The second print has had sepia toning. This changes the whole depth and appearance of the print. I also personally think it gives good skin tones to this curvaceous young lady.

Kingston upon Hull, North Humberside, England.

From no specific project as such, circa 1988.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Friday, 26 April 2013

BLEACHED


A monochrome photographic print which as been copper toned. The image is of some obviously dead tree branches that have fallen into a peat bog. The copper toning has rendered them almost white.

Printed on fibre based photographic paper.

Thorne and Hatfield Moors, South Yorkshire, England. Now know as the Humber Head Peatlands.

From a group project, circa 1993.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Monday, 22 April 2013

TIME AGAIN


I have posted the above monochrome photographic print because I heard of the recent sad passing of Storm Thorgerson. Some of you will know straight away who I am talking about. His album cover designs were pieces of art in their own right, in my own opinion he stands alongside the likes of Roger Dean and Dennis Riggs.

Back in the 1970s and perhaps later decades I know that I used to buy LPs based not just on their musical content but also that of the artwork on the cover and inner sleeve design. I have a lovely book of his designs which is entitled: Mind over Matter - The Images of Pink Floyd.

Back in the 1960s and 70s there was no CAD available, so designers like Storm relied upon pure artwork and photography to produce album covers for not just Pink Floyd but for 10cc and Peter Gabriel. Sadly another of my teenage heroes passes away.

Kingston upon Hull, North Humberside, England.

From the Constructed Images module for a 9231 City & Guilds Certificate in Photography, Circa 1994.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Friday, 12 April 2013

RETICULATION PRINT


Reticulation takes place when you subject the film to very hot temperatures at the end of normal processing followed immediately by an ice cold stop bath. You then fix the film normally. I found it best to boil a kettle of water then wait about 2 minutes or so for it to cool down slightly (so as to not damage the plastic film developing tank). Empty the film developer out of the tank then replace this straightaway with the hot water. Give it 1-to-2 minutes and then pour away the hot water. Then take your jug of cold water (that as been in the fridge complete with ice cubes in it for a few hours) and pour this into the tank (again give it about 2 minutes and then pour away and fix the film as per normal.

This process is very hit and miss though. I also imagine that today's film emulsion are far stronger and will not allow you to do this. The film that I used was a cheap roll (not Ilford or Kodak).

The resulting photographic prints will have small dark dots or circles. You notice this when you have the film negatives in the enlarger and are using your focusing scope to focus in. You will see the reticulation effect if you click onto and enlarge the image.

Kingston upon Hull, North Humberside, England.

From a City & Guilds 9231 Certificate in Photography for the Image Derivation module, circa 1993.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.


Thursday, 11 April 2013

JIGSAW WINDOW


This featured monochrome photographic print looks very much like one of those crazy mirrors you used to see at a fair (the ones that distort and change your reflection so that you either look like a Thin Lizzy or Meat Loaf).

It's just the way in which the buildings opposite this well-known local office block look like when reflected in the glass-clad exterior of this building.

Kingston upon Hull, North Humberside, England.

From no specific project as such, circa 1991.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Tuesday, 9 April 2013

ECHOES


A monochromatic photo-montage. Very simple in it's production. This particular photographic print is based upon the album track of the same name (Echoes) by Pink Floyd. I was experimenting with various photographic techniques and ways of producing the finished pieces to represent a specific song or track.

This one is entitled: Echoes from the album Meddle. In my own personal opinion you have not lived if you was not fortunate and lucky enough to see Pink Floyd play live. Probably my favourite group of all time.

Lee was about 3 years old when I took this. Now he is a a fully grown up young man, with a son of his own.

Kingston upon Hull, North Humberside, England.

From a City & Guilds 9231 Photography Course in the Constructed Image module. Which I successful completed at Hull Community Artworks, circa 1992.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Monday, 8 April 2013

SEPIA THEN COPPER TONED


Another example of how chemical toning can alter the the tonal depth and appearance of a monochrome photographic print. The top and first print is one that was sepia toned. The second and bottom print is one that was copper toned.

The sepia toning actually emphasis the texture of the bark on this willow tree and gives the print a overall lightness. Whilst the copper toning gives a slightly darker and pink reddish feel to the print.

Kingston upon Hull. North Humberside, England.

From no specific project as such, circa 1990.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Sunday, 7 April 2013

STUDIO BASED PORTRAITURE


From the early 1990s in the photographic studio at the old former Hull Community Artworks. This monochrome photographic print was a simply lit shot with a white background. The young lady featured here had (in my own opinion) beautiful skin tones and perfectly applied make-up. Apart from that she was very photogenic.

This print was then printed up onto Ilford fibre-based photographic paper (no toning).

Hull Community Artworks, Kingston upon Hull, North Humberside, England.

From no specific project as such, circa 1993.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Monday, 11 March 2013

MONOCHROME THEN BLUE TONED


The same subject from a slightly different perspective. Also the second photographic print was printed slightly longer and therefore is slightly darker than the first print. The first print is a straight forward normal monochrome photographic print, the second one is the same but it has been toned in a blue bath chemical toner.

However this gives you a good idea how toning can alter the tonal depth and therefore perspective and look of a monochrome photographic print. To find out more about this location just click on: royal armouries

The Hall of Steel, The Royal Armouries, Leeds, West Yorkshire, England.

From an assignment that I did for a Photography and Related Studies course at Hull College, 1995-98.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Saturday, 9 March 2013

NOTICE BOARD

WALKING ON THE MOON: FACT NOT FICTION

Having recently visited the Focus on Imaging annual event at The N.E.C. Whilst gazing at the cameras in their glass display cases on the Hasselblad stand. One of the staff kindly let a good friend of mine, and I take a closer look and handle one of the cameras that Hasselblad provided the Apollo 11 mission with to practise on before their moon landing on July 21st 1969.

Hasselblad had made modifications to this camera so that the astronauts could handle and use it, when wearing their space suit gloves. These included various additions to aid handling and focusing. The actual Hasselblads that Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin used on the moon are still up there. The third member of the crew - Michael Collins was responsible for piloting the command spacecraft and therefore did not set foot on the moon.

They brought back the film backs and left the camera bodies up there. The camera bodies were later modified even further by making them lighter. According to relevant sources these cameras are still usable due to their being no atmosphere on the surface of the moon, meaning no corrosion (rusting) takes place. Many thanks indeed to the lady who allowed us this to handle and view up close this iconic camera and model.

To find out more about Hasselblad cameras and this story just click onto: Space cameras

Trevor David Betts

9th March 2013.

CLOUDS AND BLUE SKY


One of my colour photographic prints for a change. This one is of a well-known local landmark and office block. The glass in this building is the type that you cannot see through from the outside (but can from the inside). Taken on Fuji colour film rated at 100asa.

Europa House, Kingston upon Hull, North Humberside, England.

From no specific project as such, circa 1989.

Copyright of all images displayed on this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Tuesday, 5 March 2013

NOTICE BOARD

Dust off your old film cameras and starting creating 'real' images

Some 15 years ago I changed careers from a budding semi-professional photographer to that of another profession. During this period I have kept a loose interest in photography, but it is only within the past year that I have decided to attempt to become a professional photographer once again. Oh, how things have changed - and for the worse!

Having been taught photography using film, 35mm to 10 x 8 cameras and darkrooms. I am used to pressing the shutter release when I am confident I have the shot I want, processing the film carefully and methodically, and then, if the image is to be printed, spending time in the darkroom or lab producing a quality print. All-in-all, it was a well-thought-out, well-prepared exercise that filtered out the technically good and artistically gifted photographer who would go onto forge a successful career.

Nowadays, well, where do I begin? Many of today's breed of photographer (amateur or professional) do not deserve the title of photographer, in my opinion - a more accurate description would be 'graphic designer with a camera person'.
I am astounded at how often I hear, or read, about how much a modern image is Photoshopped: to hear a 'photographer' say he is not concerned what the shot will come out like because he can fix it with his computer - or to have my photographer friend tell me of a conversation he had at the Olympics where a young student was filming the event with his DSLR and intended to obtain his photograph from a video still - is shocking!

Where is the skill in today's photography? Worse is the fact that I no longer know if what I am looking at is actually real, because the vast proportion of images have had varying degrees of cosmetic surgery. If I were to give a roll of Fujichrome Velvia 50 and my Nikon 50 and my Nikon F5 to many of the new breed of photographer, they would not be able to draw with light, hence they would not be a photographer.

I think now is the time for the industry to start publishing 'real' images (images that could be created in a darkroom is the limit) and to label them as authentic, so we can see what can be produced in the camera and not in the computer.

As for me, I can assure you that while I am in Katmandu, Nepal for a few weeks, I will have my light meter with me and I will press that shutter when I think I have a shot - and the resulting images will not be booked in for a nip and tuck.

From an article in the Back Chat section of the Amateur Photographer magazine 9th March 2013 issue. By AP Reader Ian Shore.

An edited version appears here.

Friday, 1 March 2013

AUTUMNAL SHADOWS


In this monochrome photographic print. Fallen leafs upon a wooden footpath the sun casts shadows from nearby trees and they dance and create a mixture of shadow and highlights. If you would like to know more about this location then just click on: Country Park.

The Humber Bridge Country Park, near Hessle, East Yorkshire, England.

From no specific project as such, circa 1994.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Friday, 22 February 2013

FALLEN LEAFS


In this autumnal monochrome photographic print, fallen leafs and the sun cast shadows on a wooden boardwalk and earth.

The Humber Bridge Country Park, Hessle near Kingston upon Hull, North Humberside, England.

From no specific project as such, circa 1994.

Monday, 18 February 2013

PAINTING WITH DEV - THE FINAL ONE


As the title says, a final monochrome photographic print that was sprayed with developer and then sepia toned. See the two previous relevant posts for more details on this experimental technique and method.

Hull Community Artworks, Kingston upon Hull, North Humberside, England.

For a City & Guilds 9231 Certificate in Photography in the Image Derivation module, circa 1993.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Wednesday, 13 February 2013

MORE PAINTING WITH DEV


Another example of painting with photographic paper developer. The concept was for a design for a Musician's Album Cover. For the Image Derivation module of a 9231 City and Guilds Certificate in Photography. The young man in the above studio portrait is the same person in the post of 19th January 2013.

Basically instead of fully immersing the exposed photographic print in the developing tray. You load up a water bottle (similar to those that you can purchase for watering flowers, with a trigger release) with a small solution of photographic paper developer. Then placing the print in a clean dry tray you just liberally spray the print with the solution. Then stop and fix as per normal.

Hull Community Artworks, Kingston upon Hull, North Humberside, England.

An experimental print for the above mentioned module and certificate, circa 1993.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Monday, 11 February 2013

ANOTHER ZOOMED EXPOSURE


This monochrome photographic print was taken with my 70-210mm telephoto lens fitted to the camera. The camera was held in place by the clamp from my Cullmann Touring set. After the first timed exposure, the lens was moved by a fraction (and so on) until the exposure was completed.

From a foot bridge over the A63 (Clive Sullivan Way), Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From no specific project as such. Experimental shot, circa 1997.

Saturday, 9 February 2013

FALLS AGAIN


This time, this monochrome photographic print was sepia toned. It's virtually from the same spot as the previous post. But this one was taken in landscape format as opposed to portrait.

Aysgarth, North Yorkshire, England.

From no specific project as such. circa 1989.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Friday, 8 February 2013

SELENIUM FALLS


A selenium toned monochrome photographic print of the River Ure and a section of Aysgarth Falls. The River Ure flows over a series of limestone steps which are known as Aysgarth Falls.

For more information about this specific location and the Yorkshire Dales just click onto: Falls.

Aysgarth, North Yorkshire, England.

From no specific project as such, circa 1989.

Copyright of all images displayed on this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Monday, 4 February 2013

WHERE'S MY NUTS?


A grey squirrel in the process of just about to leave the Museum Gardens and venture onto the footpath by the River Ouse.

York, North Yorkshire, England.

From a City & Guilds 9231 Natural History module, which I never completed or handed in for assessment, circa 1994.

Copyright of all images displayed on this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Saturday, 2 February 2013

CURVED LIGHT TRAILS


Taken from a footbridge over the A63 (Clive Sullivan Way). A timed long exposure which renders traffic lights as a constant blur/streak.

The A63, Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From no specific project as such. An experimental shot, circa 1997.

Copyright of all images displayed on this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.
 

Tuesday, 29 January 2013

HARBOUR


The monochrome photographic print featured here was selenium toned (giving the finished print a slight purple tinge). Selenium toning gives the print more tonal depth at the same time giving it an archival permanence (meaning that the print will never fade).

If you would like to find out more about this location and the county of Cornwall in general please just click onto: Cornwall.

Padstow Harbour, Cornwall, England.

From no specific project as such, circa 1988.

Copyright of all images displayed on this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Saturday, 26 January 2013

WATER RUNS THROUGH IT


One of the many water courses that are situated in the Humberhead Peatlands National Nature Reserve (NNR). It is also known as Humberhead Levels. When I photographed this landscape back in 1993 it was known has Thorne and Hatfield Moors. It is one of the last surviving peat bog habitats in England.

If you want more information on this area just click onto: Peat. 
This will take you to the Natural England web site where you can find out much more about this specific location (and many others).

Thorne and Hatfield Moors, South Yorkshire, England.

From a project about Thorne and Hatfield Moors. In association with the Peat Preservation Society, Hull Community Artworks, Kate Mellor, Patrick Sutherland and the late Fay Godwin, 1993.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Saturday, 19 January 2013

IMAGE DERIVATION


This monochrome photographic portrait was produced in the studio, taken on Ilford FP4 film. The finished print was then printed onto Ilford matt-finish fibre based photographic paper. A clear opaque liquid mask was then applied to the jeans area and the print was then sepia toned. Then the jeans and parts of the guitar were tinted using photographic dyes.

Once again, the sepia toning as resulted in very natural skin tones. The young man in the above portrait is the father of the young lady and gent in the posts of 2nd January and 23rd November 2012.

Hull Community Artworks Studio, Kingston upon Hull, North Humberside, England.

For a City & Guilds 9231 Image Derivation module, circa 1993.

Copyright of all images displayed in this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Wednesday, 16 January 2013

LIGHT STREAKS


A colour photographic print, for a change. This one was taken by securing my camera to the inside of a car windscreen via a ball and socket swivel head that were attached to a rubber suction cap (just two items from my splendid old Cullman touring set). Which consists of a small lightweight tripod, wood spike, ground spike, ball and socket swivel head, rubber suction cap and an adjustable metal clamp.

The camera was then set on 10 second delay with my Canon remote switch attached. Exposures were then bracketed with the lens aperture of F8. The film used was Fuji colour film rated at 100 asa. No blue filter was fitted to the camera lens (hence the orange cast from the overhead street lighting).

The A63 near Kingston upon Hull, North Humberside, England.

From no specific project as such. Experimental shot, circa 1989.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Tuesday, 15 January 2013

WELL!


This monochrome photographic print of this young lady was taken on Ilford FP4 film rated at 100 asa. Using studio lighting. It was then printed on Ilford pearl (matt finish) photographic paper, then sepia toned (which in this instance gives a very good natural look to the models own natural skin tones and blonde hair).

Her necklace, buttons and ring where then carefully hand-tinted by a small brush using special photographic dyes.

The post of Tuesday 3rd January 2012 entitled: "Painting With Dev Again." Is the same print and model.

Kingston upon Hull, North Humberside, England.

From no specific project as such. Experimental print, circa 1988.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Monday, 14 January 2013

THAT BRIDGE AGAIN!


It's that bridge once again. This time this renowned feat of engineering and a local and regional landmark is seen through the remains of some wooden fencing close to Hessle on the North Bank. The tower in this view is the South Bank Tower close to Barton upon Humber. A monochrome photographic print. Printed on Ilford fibre based photographic paper.

If you would like to find out more about this Bridge then just click onto: Bridge

Hessle Haven near Kingston upon Hull, North Humberside, England.

From no specific project as such, circa 1994.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Sunday, 13 January 2013

FRIAR TUCK


An actor taking on the role of Friar Tuck, during the annual "Sherwood Forest Festival."

Edwinstowe, Sherwood Forest, Nottinghamshire, England.

From my Tree Stories Project, 2002-.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Thursday, 10 January 2013

RABBIT


The same one that is featured in the monochrome photographic print: "Bunny." Images from a series of photographs that I took for a Natural History module in City & Guilds Photography (I never finished it).

Near The Humber Bridge, Hessle near Kingston upon Hull, North Humberside, England, circa 1994.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Saturday, 5 January 2013

RECEPTION !



The Reception area at the P.D.S.A Animal Treatment Centre, on Brunswick Avenue in Hull (1989). Since then it has been refurbished and updated.

The People's Dispensary for Sick Animals Animal Treatment Centre, Kingston upon Hull, North Humberside, England. For more information on the P.D.S.A. just click onto: Animals.

From my For the Animals Project, and the Social Documentary module for a City & Guilds 9231 Certificate in Photography, 1989.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Thursday, 3 January 2013

MR OR MRS HOG


Another monochrome photographic print from the Hull Hedgehog Hospital (circa 1994). A young patient recovering from treatment and soon to be released back into the wild. For more details about the current Hull Hedgehog Hospital and Hull Animal Welfare just click onto: Hedgehogs.

The old former Hull Hedgehog Hospital, Bricknell Avenue, Kingston upon Hull, North Humberside, England.

From no specific project as such, 1994.

Copyright of all images displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

SLIDE SHOW

HELLO AND WELCOME

To my Photo Blog,

All my monochrome photography is darkroom produced. This portfolio consists of photographs from several of my projects, assignments, personal and course related work. Some of these monochrome photographic prints are then selectively toned.

Take a look at the slide show, or the popular posts. Click onto some of the many excellent blogs that I have listed in my blog roll. I welcome constructive feedback (post a comment).

Click onto the links in some of my posts which will then take you to the relevant website link where you will be able to find out more about that location, charity or organisation etc featured in the post and which is relevant to that specific image.

Also please click onto my links. Join my blog and my Google + followers. If you would like to know more about any particular photograph or project then please send me an email. My email address is at the foot of this page.

Also from time to time I will post videos that are of interest to me, mainly from my military background.

Yours sincerely

Trevor David Betts BA (Hons)

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TECHNICAL INFORMATION

All the photographs featured on this blog spot were taken on Canon analog 35mm SLR cameras which included: Canon A1, Canon AE1 (non-programme) and Canon T90. The Canon A1 was rendered useless after prolonged exposure to salt spray residue, and the AE1 suffered a malfunction, and one of my T90s just packed up on me during a photographic shoot.

Most of my camera equipment was initially purchased brand new, then as the years have past I have purchased second-hand equipment. But the vast majority of equipment I currently possess is well over twenty years old.

Canon FD lenses used were: 28, and 35mm wide angle, 50mm standard, 35-105mm short telephoto zoom and a 70-210mm large telephoto zoom lenses. Also used was a loaned Mamiya 645 with 50 and 80mm lenses. My favourite combination is a T90 fitted with the 35-105mm lens with an Hoya orange filter. I use Hoya orange, red, neutral density, and skylight filters. Hoya and Canon lens hoods. A Canon remote cable. I have used a great Metz 45 CT-4 flashgun for many years. I used this for the bounced and fill-in flash for some of the documentary and portraiture work.

Studio flash used was Courtenay brolly flash (just two heads fitted with soft boxes) at Hull Community Artworks studio (sadly this excellent local arts facility closed in 2001). Billingham and Tamrac camera bags (the Billingham is a old model that I have had for years - wonderful bags). The Tamrac one is a medium sized back pack type bag. Slik Black Diamond 88, and 500 DX Pro tripods. A Cullmann touring set (which consists of a light tripod, ball and swivel head, all-purpose clamp, suction cap, and a ground spike). I presently have three Canon T90 and one A1 SLR cameras.

Film used was mainly 35mm (with some 120mm). Ilford Delta monochrome negative print film, 100 asa (a few rolls of 400 asa as well). Ilford HP5 and FP4 (400 and 125 asa respectively). Fuji Neopan 400 asa. Various Fuji colour film. Photographic chemicals: Ilford ID-11 and Microphen film developers. Agfa Rodinal fine grain film developer, and Ilford Hypam fixer.

Photographic paper: Ilford Multigrade IV VC paper, Fibre based VC paper including warm and cool tone. Kentmere Velvet Stipple and Art Document papers. Kodak selenium toner. Barclay and Fotospeed sepia toners, and Colorvir blue toner. Durst M60 and Meopta 5 enlargers fitted with 50 and 80mm Schneider lenses. Kenro negative sheets and Jessops negative folders.

Most of my photography involves the use of the camera being securely mounted onto the tripod, with the shutter set to the 10 second delay. I bracket my exposures (relying on the excellent Canon in-camera meter). My aperture settings are usually between F5.6 and F22. In the vast majority of cases the very first exposure I take is usually the correctly exposed one.

Finished photographic prints (spotted if needed). At the 10 x 8 inch size are then scanned on an Epsom 1660 photo perfection scanner using Adope Photoshop CS2 at the 5.5 x 3.5 inch image or canvas size, 150 dpi and at the 750 x 550 pixels size, and saved as for the web. The only thing that is manipulated is the brightness balance and contrast levels.

DON'T FORGET

"It is the soldier, not the minister, who has given us freedom of religion.

It is the soldier, not the lawyer, who has given us the right to fair protest.

It is the soldier, not the politician, who has given us freedom of speech.

It is the soldier, whose coffin is draped by the flag, who allows the protester to burn the flag."

From: "Fighting for Queen and Country,
by Nigel 'Spud' Ely. Blake Publishing London, 2007.
"