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COPYRIGHT NOTICE

No photograph that is displayed and posted on this blog may be reproduced, copied, stored, manipulated or used in whole or in part of a derivative work without the prior written permission of the Copyright (c) Owner & Photographer: Trevor David Betts BA (Hons). All rights reserved.

A POLITE REMINDER

If you want to use any of my photographs displayed upon this blog, for inclusion in an essay, presentation, talk, or for posting on your blog or web site. Or for use in any other way or means. Then it would be very much appreciated if you could contact me first (as a matter of courtesy and decency) to seek my permission to use any of my photographs. Failure to do so is breach of my copyright and rights.




Thursday, 29 October 2009

JUST LOOKING

Two ladies indulge in a spot of window shopping, by looking into the front of this shop.

The People's Dispensary for Sick Animals (PDSA), Charity Shop, Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From the For the Animals Project, 1989.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

STATION REFLECTIONS

A puddle on one of the platforms clearly shows a section of the Railway Station's roof.

Paragon Railway Station, Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From the Chasing Shadows Project, 1998.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Sunday, 25 October 2009

WAITING

Members of the public with their domestic pets wait in the Waiting and Reception area of the PDSA Animal Treatment Centre to see the duty Vet.

The PDSA Animal Treatment Centre, Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From the For the Animals Project, 1989.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

NOTICEBOARD

I DON'T LIKE EXPLOSIONS

Quite apt this title don't you think at this time of year when all the young pyro-maniacs and trainee arsonists are busy setting off fireworks left, right and centre.

"I don't like explosions. I don't mind progress. But digital photography has made every man, women and chimpanzee a photographer of sorts and consequently has numbed down the general quality of photographs" - Elliott Erwitt.

From a retrospective exhibition of his work at the National Media Centre, Bradford, West Yorkshire, England. 2008.

TOO MANY CARS

In this image is a mutiple in-camera shot of a parking lot, shot from a nearby high rise building, the finished print was sepia toned.

Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From no specific project as such, 1989.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Thursday, 22 October 2009

SEATED AT WHITBY

People enjoying a sit down on the quayside, with the church on the cliff top opposite in clear view, that inspired Bram Stoker when he was writing "Dracula".

Whitby, North Yorkshire, England.

From the Traces from along the Edge Project, 2005-.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the xclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Wednesday, 21 October 2009

PEBBLE

A large pebble is stuck in the gap between two pieces of a wooden 'groyne'. Which is part of the beach defences.

Sandsend, North Yorkshire, England.

From the Traces from along the Edge Project, 2005-.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All right reserved.

NOTICEBOARD

TWIN TOWERS RISE AGAIN

Police photographer Neil Kitson could not believe his eyes on a recent trip to New York. The horrific events of 9/11 changed the New York skyline forever but when the West Yorkshire Police photographer went to commemorate the eighth anniversary of the terror attacks, The Twin Towers made an eerie return.

Mr Kitson was photographing the annual Tribute in Light memorial at Ground Zero when this image was captured - and it was severe weather conditions that temporarily brought the towers back to life.

"Normally the lights are more cylinder-like" said Mr Kitson, a photographer with the force for 20 years. "But because it was raining heavily and there were gale force winds on the night, the wind must have whipped up the clouds and made them look rectangular. "It just looked so real, I couldn't believe it. "It was a dog walker who suddenly shouted, 'Look, the Twin Towers are back', so I just got my camera out and started snapping away".

After he returned from his six-day trip, Mr Kitson sent the pictures to Getty Images only to be told by its New York office that they looked too fake and "too Photoshopped". After having to send the original shots to Getty to prove they were legitimate and with assistance from the London office, the images were finally accepted and will now be permanently marketed by Getty.

Mr Kitson said: "It was so frustrating that they didn't believe me. I thought it was strange that none of the papers the following day had picked up on it so I thought I'd take advantage".

One of his images is now being used to create a postcard which will be sold in the New York Police Department Museum shop. All other proceeds made from his images with Getty will be given to the British Memorial Garden Trust at Hanover Square, New York.


From an article in the Yorkshire Post newspaper, 20 October 2009. By Joanne Ginley.

Tuesday, 20 October 2009

BEN AND SUITCASE

Normandy Veteran and former WWII RAF Regiment Soldier Ben Bainbridge poses for the camera, holding his sister's 1939 evacuee issue suitcase.

Paddington, London, England.

From The Normandy Veterans - (Lest we forget) project, 1998-2002.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

NOTICEBOARD

BEACH BAN

A photographer told by a council official he was not allowed to take pictures on a Dorset beach without a permit - because of a new 'bylaw' - is taking the matter up with politicians. Speaking to AP, Steve Cook fears the rule will hit wedding photographers who regularly use the beaches for their work.

It has also emerged that photographers must seek permission from Poole Council before taking 'commercial photographs on council-owned land'. The council says photographers also need to prove they have 'public liability insurance'.

Steve Cook had being taking photographs on the Sandbanks Beach for a charity project when a council warden stopped him. He displayed a photo rights card issued last year by the Bureau of Freelance Photographers, but to no avail.

Amid reports that a commercial photography permit is also now required for the borough's 'public highways', the incensed photographer promptly wrote to the council chiefs and local MP, Annette Brooke and Robert Syms. In the letter seen by AP, Cook blasts the move as 'petty officialdom'. He adds: 'Originally I was told that it was a Poole bylaw, now it just seems that there is a secret (that is, no one knows about it) directive that all professional photographers need a permit to take photographs in the Borough of Poole, including pavements and public highways.

'Not only is this blatantly an infringement of civil liberties, going against Home Office and Number 10 advice, but it is totally unworkable. 'I would need in excess of 20-30 permits a week to carry out my work (as would most other pro photographers). Cook has called for an end to the 'outrageous restrictions on the 'livelihood and civil liberties of all professional photographers'.

Poole Council admits that the warden was 'incorrect' in telling Cook that the move was the result of a new bylaw. In a statement, a council official spokesman added: 'While we are keen to promote our beaches and other locations in Poole for this purpose, we must also balance this with the interests of other beach users and our duty to ensure public safety.'

The council later told AP that the requirement for permission and proof of public liability insurance is also designed to protect the privacy of children. This incident is the latest in a long line of clashes between photographers and officialdom over the past couple of years, sparking AP's nationwide campaign to defend the rights of photographers in public places.


From an article in Amateur Photographer magazine on the 'Snapshot' page column of the 24 October 2009 issue.

Monday, 5 October 2009

HULL & HUMBER

The "Hull & Humber" boat is moored up here just days before the start of the "Clipper Round the World Race".

The Marina, Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From no specific project as such, 2009.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Sunday, 4 October 2009

SWING BRIDGE

An old Swing Bridge is in the foreground of this shot. With the boat's from the "Round the World Clipper Race", moored up in the background.

From no specific project as such, 2009.

The Marina, Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

OLD STONE

The base of an old stone monument, which is showing signs of decay is featured here.

Undercliffe Cemetery, Bradford, West Yorkshire, England.

From no specific project as such, 2009.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

Friday, 2 October 2009

CAPE BRETON

The Canadian entrant in the "Clipper Round the World Race". Moored up in Hull Marina before the start of the race.

The Marina, Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England.

From no specific project as such, 2009.

Copyright of all images and work displayed upon this blog spot are the exclusive property of Trevor David Betts. All rights reserved.

SLIDE SHOW

HELLO AND WELCOME

To my Photo Blog,

All my monochrome photography is darkroom produced. This portfolio consists of photographs from several of my projects, assignments, personal and course related work. Some of these monochrome photographic prints are then selectively toned.

Take a look at the slide show, or the popular posts. Click onto some of the many excellent blogs that I have listed in my blog roll. I welcome constructive feedback (post a comment).

Click onto the links in some of my posts which will then take you to the relevant website link where you will be able to find out more about that location, charity or organisation etc featured in the post and which is relevant to that specific image.

Also please click onto my links. Join my blog and my Google + followers. If you would like to know more about any particular photograph or project then please send me an email. My email address is at the foot of this page.

Also from time to time I will post videos that are of interest to me, mainly from my military background.

Yours sincerely

Trevor David Betts BA (Hons)

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TECHNICAL INFORMATION

All the photographs featured on this blog spot were taken on Canon analog 35mm SLR cameras which included: Canon A1, Canon AE1 (non-programme) and Canon T90. The Canon A1 was rendered useless after prolonged exposure to salt spray residue, and the AE1 suffered a malfunction, and one of my T90s just packed up on me during a photographic shoot.

Most of my camera equipment was initially purchased brand new, then as the years have past I have purchased second-hand equipment. But the vast majority of equipment I currently possess is well over twenty years old.

Canon FD lenses used were: 28, and 35mm wide angle, 50mm standard, 35-105mm short telephoto zoom and a 70-210mm large telephoto zoom lenses. Also used was a loaned Mamiya 645 with 50 and 80mm lenses. My favourite combination is a T90 fitted with the 35-105mm lens with an Hoya orange filter. I use Hoya orange, red, neutral density, and skylight filters. Hoya and Canon lens hoods. A Canon remote cable. I have used a great Metz 45 CT-4 flashgun for many years. I used this for the bounced and fill-in flash for some of the documentary and portraiture work.

Studio flash used was Courtenay brolly flash (just two heads fitted with soft boxes) at Hull Community Artworks studio (sadly this excellent local arts facility closed in 2001). Billingham and Tamrac camera bags (the Billingham is a old model that I have had for years - wonderful bags). The Tamrac one is a medium sized back pack type bag. Slik Black Diamond 88, and 500 DX Pro tripods. A Cullmann touring set (which consists of a light tripod, ball and swivel head, all-purpose clamp, suction cap, and a ground spike). I presently have three Canon T90 and one A1 SLR cameras.

Film used was mainly 35mm (with some 120mm). Ilford Delta monochrome negative print film, 100 asa (a few rolls of 400 asa as well). Ilford HP5 and FP4 (400 and 125 asa respectively). Fuji Neopan 400 asa. Various Fuji colour film. Photographic chemicals: Ilford ID-11 and Microphen film developers. Agfa Rodinal fine grain film developer, and Ilford Hypam fixer.

Photographic paper: Ilford Multigrade IV VC paper, Fibre based VC paper including warm and cool tone. Kentmere Velvet Stipple and Art Document papers. Kodak selenium toner. Barclay and Fotospeed sepia toners, and Colorvir blue toner. Durst M60 and Meopta 5 enlargers fitted with 50 and 80mm Schneider lenses. Kenro negative sheets and Jessops negative folders.

Most of my photography involves the use of the camera being securely mounted onto the tripod, with the shutter set to the 10 second delay. I bracket my exposures (relying on the excellent Canon in-camera meter). My aperture settings are usually between F5.6 and F22. In the vast majority of cases the very first exposure I take is usually the correctly exposed one.

Finished photographic prints (spotted if needed). At the 10 x 8 inch size are then scanned on an Epsom 1660 photo perfection scanner using Adope Photoshop CS2 at the 5.5 x 3.5 inch image or canvas size, 150 dpi and at the 750 x 550 pixels size, and saved as for the web. The only thing that is manipulated is the brightness balance and contrast levels.

DON'T FORGET

"It is the soldier, not the minister, who has given us freedom of religion.

It is the soldier, not the lawyer, who has given us the right to fair protest.

It is the soldier, not the politician, who has given us freedom of speech.

It is the soldier, whose coffin is draped by the flag, who allows the protester to burn the flag."

From: "Fighting for Queen and Country,
by Nigel 'Spud' Ely. Blake Publishing London, 2007.
"